More about LSPs

What is an LSP?

A person who provides professional language services to D/deaf and non-deaf people to aid communication and bridge the barriers that exist due to linguistic and cultural differences.

What is Lip speaking?

Lip speakers work with people who prefer to communicate through lip-reading and speech. Both deaf and hearing people can use lip speakers to help them communicate with each other. Lip speakers repeat what is said without using their voice, so that it can be lip-read easily. They produce the shape of words clearly, with the flow, rhythm and phrasing of speech. They use natural gestures and facial expressions to help the client follow what is being said. They will also use finger spelling if asked to. If you would like to make a booking enquiry, please do complete our online booking form.

What is a Notetaker?

A Notetaker takes clear notes in handwritten English or by typing the notes using a laptop computer; this service can be a useful reasonable adjustment for people who cannot take notes themselves, such as D/deaf people. If you are watching a British Sign Language (BSL)/English interpreter or lip speaker, it is impossible to take notes and follow what is being said at the same time. With the notetaker taking notes a D/deaf person can concentrate on what is being said and not miss out on important information. If you would like to make a booking enquiry, please do complete our online booking form.

What is a Deafblind Interpreter?

Deaf/Blind Interpreters provide communication services between Deaf/Blind people and non-Deaf/Blind people. They work with a range of communication methods including British Sign Language, hands-on-signing, clear communication, the Block Alphabet and the Deafblind Manual Alphabet. If you would like to make a booking enquiry, please do complete our online booking form.

What is a Speech to Text Reporter or Palantypist?

Speech-to-text reporters (sometimes referred to as Palantypists), are highly trained and qualified professionals who use a special keyboard to type every word that is spoken by a speaker, typing the words phonetically – that is, how they sound rather than how they’re spelt. This is then converted back into English. Everything that is typed appears on a computer screen or can be projected onto a larger screen for more than one service user. By typing in this way, the reporter can keep up with the speed of spoken English. The resulting English is usually spelt at least 95% correctly and the remaining words are spelt roughly how they sound. The reporter will supply all their own equipment so it is important to ensure access to sufficient power points and that a suitable table and chair is provided. There is normally an additional charge for the use of the equipment and a further charge for transcription. If you require the service to be projected for more than one service user, then it is necessary to provide a projector and screen. Speech-to-text reporting is suitable for deaf people who are comfortable reading English, often at high speed and sometimes for up to a couple of hours at a time. If you would like to make a booking enquiry, please do complete our online booking form.